“Trust I seek and I find in you…”

 

 

The ‘sphere is quick to point out the innumerable horrors, lies, cruelties and injustices that are all too common in this world.

I cast no stones.

In fact, I consider myself one of those that do so with the greatest rapidity.

However, there exist beautiful (if somewhat tragic) Truths that demand to shine through the seemingly ineffable darkness.

This is one of them:

 

masculinebeauty

 

Tell me again how “men are nothing but cruel brutes”.

Remind me that a “father is the unnecessary parent”.

Comment in bold letters how all of us simply exist to pump and dump; caring nothing for progeny.

 

My only problem with the image:

The man’s number is obscured.

Because I’d like to call him.

And tell him I wish my dad were more like him.

 

Though it may be tough to dial.

As the cigarette smoke seems to have my eyes watering a bit.

 

 

Ω

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13 Responses to ““Trust I seek and I find in you…””

  1. Your closing paragraphs struck a chord. It’s been 12 years since I last saw my own father, and he appears to have been doing his utmost to convince himself he never had a son in the meantime.

    I’m certain a poll of ‘sphere bloggers would indicate at least 90% had an absent or lacking father. The comfort is that out of necessity we had to learn from their failings, and will not repeat the same mistakes.

    • Your closing paragraphs struck a chord. It’s been 12 years since I last saw my own father, and he appears to have been doing his utmost to convince himself he never had a son in the meantime.

      I’ve never been so sad to hear I resonated so well.


      “I’m certain a poll of ‘sphere bloggers would indicate at least 90% had an absent or lacking father. The comfort is that out of necessity we had to learn from their failings, and will not repeat the same mistakes.”

      If I nodded in agreement with any greater fervor, I’d snap my own neck.

  2. I don’t usually find your house so dusty but today I seem to need to rub my eyes.

    My father died in 2008 before I had the chance or the inclination to try and know him. He was mostly absent before then. I do wonder how much I lost by growing up without a dad who was more than school fees and the occasional chip dinner, and assume that this is part of why I have a powerful ache to have my own progeny.

    Did not expect this here, got hit all the harder for the surprise, it is good to see an example of a dad and feel humbled by it as opposed to contempt for the ‘man’ holding the accessories for his handler while she shops.

    • “I don’t usually find your house so dusty but today I seem to need to rub my eyes.”

      I’m a terrible housekeeper.

      So I understand completely.

      “Did not expect this here, got hit all the harder for the surprise,”

      That was intended.

      I’m thrilled it had the effect it did.

      Even moreso that someone confessed such.

      Thank you.

      Truly.

    • “My father died in 2008 before I had the chance or the inclination to try and know him. He was mostly absent before then. I do wonder how much I lost by growing up without a dad who was more than school fees and the occasional chip dinner, and assume that this is part of why I have a powerful ache to have my own progeny.”

      Many of our fathers are still with us.

      Yet we still feel the same sense of loss.

      I applaud your ache and pray, Truly, that one day it will be soothed.

      And well, at that.

  3. I’m one of the lucky guys.

    When I lived in the UK, I was able to spend many a weekend with my father to go shooting sporting clays. On the drive to and from I picked his brain on many different topics and he taught me how to manage my emotions as I struggled to get better with the shotgun.

    No one can truthfully say that fathers are deadbeat and uncaring of their progeny.

  4. I love this post cause I know that if one of my three kids had a problem like that I’d do the exact same type of thing. Not a doubt in my mind.

    So in a lifetime of screwing up, at least I’ve got this fatherhood thing down.

    • I’m more pleased to hear that than you could possibly guess.

      Good man.

    • Regarding your last sentence, I must add, as the song I chose was meant to imply [my work is intended to be read on multiple levels and very deeply]:

      “Nothing else matters.”

  5. […] “Trust I seek and I find in you…”  (Apocalyptica – Nothing Else Matters) […]

  6. Great stuff, Ace.
    My father was “lacking” as well. Nevertheless, he did the best he could with the gifts he was given: he taught me to love shooting, reloading, and to fix vehicles. He was also given to anger.
    The best lesson he gave me was to do the best I could with what I’m given, and I’m thankful for it.

    • Many thanks, Wanderer.

      “The best lesson he gave me was to do the best I could with what I’m given, and I’m thankful for it.”

      To be fair, that’s a one of the best lessons to learn.

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