“I dare you to call my bluff; [I] can’t take too much of a good thing…”

 

 

[I’ll add more to this post later but wanted to throw it out there.]

A woman whom I treasure a great deal once said:

“Men love women that are the rule.

Women love men that are the exception.”

Given gender qualities and reproductive strategies, this statement frames things quite well.

However, let’s frame this in a way I find more to my style.

 

 

Women are gambling addicts.

Take a moment.

Let that soak into your mind.

 

 

See, women like choices.

Women like drama.

Women are thrilled by risk.

What does that describe, if not a member of Gamblers Anonymous?

 

 

Women are masters at spinning plates.

There’s a term for that.

“Hedging One’s Bets”.

 

 

Women like mystery in a man; the idea they can’t completely figure him out.

There’s a term for that.

“[He Has A] Down Card”.

 

 

Women are notorious for putting even more effort into a relationship they want that seems to be garnering nothing but losses for them.

There’s a term for that strategy.

“Martingale.”

 

 

Women are all too eager to throw everything into a long-shot of a relationship.

There’s a term for that, too.

“All In/Letting it ride.”

 

 

Women like the idea of getting a man no other woman could.

Again, there’s a term for that.

“[Hitting the] Jackpot.”

 

 

Now, here’s the payout you’ve been awaiting:

Men are told to maintain frame control.

Well, doesn’t every casino do such a thing?

They make the rules.

They limit the stakes.

They reinforce intermittently.

 

 

Putting the above list simply:

They make reality theirs.

Even going so far as permitting no way for its patrons to tell if it’s day.

Or night.

Or even what time it is.

All this adds up to why, in the end:

The house always wins.

 

 

Recall, our lovely gambler isn’t addicted to winning.

[Thinking the above statement to be incorrect is a common, and all too dangerous, misconception].

She’s addicted to playing.

She likes the pain of loss.

She likes the rush of victory.

Give her too much of one or the other:

She’ll find another establishment.

 

 

After all:

Why do you think the term “Game” caught on so well?

 

 

 

 

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19 Responses to ““I dare you to call my bluff; [I] can’t take too much of a good thing…””

  1. Grimb Noforian Says:

    Classic. I’d put this one on the short list of recommended reads for a man new to these ideas, along with Keoni’s “conversion narrative” post. I haven’t seen it put like that before. Addicted to playing not to winning, the house controls your reality to the point where you don’t know if it’s day or night. Yeah.

    In the history of blind wise men describing elephants, you’ve crammed more of the beast into the picture than I’ve ever seen. Props.

    • Grimb,

      “In the history of blind wise men describing elephants, you’ve crammed more of the beast into the picture than I’ve ever seen. Props.”

      Many thanks.

      That means a great deal to me.

  2. I think I like this analogy better than the one on chess.

  3. She’s addicted to playing.

    She likes the pain of loss.

    She likes the rush of victory.

    Give her too much of one or the other:

    She’ll find another establishment.

    It is all about that rush. The emotional “lift” that women experience in the presence “wild and crazy” guy who manages to push all her buttons.

    When they are young and beautiful, they will go all in and bet on the worst odds, all because the thrill from an unlikely win will be that much sweeter. As they get older, they lstart paying more and more attention to the “safe bet.” But that is only because they have less to spend; they still would love nothing more than to bet it all on the long shot.

    I like the gambling analogy, it reminds me of a piece on evolutionary biology I read years ago which emphasized the risk taking nature of women. One of my first clues about the Red Pill, only I wish that I had seen it as such at the time.

    • Donal,

      Never have I known someone that gets my message and fills in the [intentional] blanks as well as you do.

      “When they are young and beautiful, they will go all in and bet on the worst odds, all because the thrill from an unlikely win will be that much sweeter. As they get older, they start paying more and more attention to the ‘safe bet’. But that is only because they have less to spend; they still would love nothing more than to bet it all on the long shot.”

      Only a pigeon would bet more than she could cover, should she lose.

      [ http://www.ildado.com/casino_glossary02.html ]

      Sadly, due to a lack of proper guidance:

      More and more women are pigeons in this game.

  4. There’s too much loss or winning in long distance.

    When the man’s “lucky”, the woman garners too many losses until she jumps ship.
    ______________

    Also – though it’s true that the man love women who are the rule – in today’s world, that same woman is now the exception.

    A poisonous paradox if acknowledged too much in her presence.
    _______________

    ~Wald

  5. Spot on. When a woman is young and beautiful she has a nearly unlimited bank account and can play at the $500 minimum table all day long, living dangerously, as they say. As she ages, she no longer gets to play at that table, but must play at progressively cheaper and cheaper tables with less well healed clientele, until eventually she is left playing by herself at the slot machines waiting and hoping for her ship to come in. It’s got to be a helluva blow to one’s ego to go from eating caviar to having to use a handi-wipe to clean your hands from pushing filthy quarters into the slot. Tragic, but can’t resist giving it just one more pull.

  6. OK Ace, I get ya on this one – and I personally love analogies – but will have to think about the consequences in the long term for both men and women. In the short term, everyone wins a little – and is relatively happy with the the exchange – in the long term though….

    Sounds like an interesting topic to explore.

  7. Which means Game is the Hi-Lo count system.

  8. wow. thank you for this analogy.

  9. […] This concept and the one explored in this post are related. […]

  10. […] “I dare you to call my bluff; [I] can’t take too much of a good thing…” (Halestorm – I Miss The Misery) […]

  11. […] “I dare you to call my bluff; [I] can’t take too much of a good thing…” (Halestorm – I Miss The Misery) […]

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